Members: Please place your sketch in alphabetical order by last name
(Use the Heading 3, not boldface, setting for the line with your name on it.)


Jean Carlson

is a member of the Department of Physics at UCSB carrying out research on a variety of complex systems

Julien Chauchat

is an associate professor at the Energy, Water and Environmental Sciences School of Engineers at the University of Grenoble (France), he's doing is research at the LEGI (Geophysical and Industrial flows laboratory). His research interests lie in the modeling of sediment transport processes (mainly two-phase approach) and numerical modeling of dense granular flows.

Marco Colombini

is a faculty member in the Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of Genoa, Italy. His main research interest is on morphodynamics with focus on the stability of river bed forms. Other research topics include: boundary layers, flow in a spherical cavity, wind-driven flow, turbulence modeling, RANS and DNS models.

Pete Diamessis

is an associate professor at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests focus on the numerical investigation of the interplay between internal gravity waves and turbulence in mid-water and in the bottom boundary layer region. Inextricably connected to this pursuit is the development of high-order accuracy element-based numerical methods. He is very keen on learning more on how internal wave-driven benthic turbulence gives rise to particle transport and resuspension and how it impacts bed morphodynamics.

Joris Eggenhuisen

is a faculty member in the Department of Earth Sciences at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. He is in charge of the Eurotank Flume Laboratory, one of the focus areas of the laboratory is experimentation with turbidity currents. The boundary conditions that are controlled are buoyancy discharge, sediment concentration, sediment grainsize distribution (up to fine grained sand), topography; and from these controls the developing flow dynamics and deposit structures are observed and analysed. Recent projects have developed collaborations with numerical modellers who treat turbidity current sediment transport and deposition within fully 3D RANS simulations.

Greg Huber

is a Deputy Director of the KITP, and a member of the Department of Physics at UCSB. He works in the area of cellular biomechanics.

Tian-Jian Hsu (Tom)

is an associate professor at the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware (UD). His research interest is in the area of sediment transport and numerical modeling/simulation. His group at the Center for Applied Coastal Research of UD focuses on studying a range of non-cohesive and cohesive sediment transport processes in sandy beaches, intertidal flats, river mouths and continental shelves.

Dieter Issler

came from theoretical particle physics to snow avalanches and soon realized that people at large were more interested in avalanches one can see than elementary particles nobody has ever seen... Working as a consultant and (part-time) researcher in the Natural Hazards division of the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo. His main research interests are the dynamics of avalanches and other gravity mass flows (submarine debris flows and turbidity currents, quick-clay slides, etc.) and in particular the mechanisms behind flow-regime changes, erosion and transformation of the slide material.

James Jenkins

is a faculty member in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. His research concerns the modeling of particle and fluid-particle flows.

Chris Johnson

is a post-doc in the schools of Mathematics and Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol, UK. His research interests are in fluid dynamics, in particular gravity currents, debris flows/lahars and granular flows. Web site

Klaus Kroy

is a theoretical physicist at the University of Leipzig, Germany, working on soft and biological matter. Research relevant for the program is focused on wind-blown sand and structure formation. Here is short video introducing some recent work on aeolian sand transport and some older work on growth and form of sand dunes .

Michele Larcher

is a faculty member in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Trento, Italy. His research concerns sediment transport and granular flows.

Eckart Meiburg

is a member of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UCSB. His research interests lie in the general area of fluid dynamics and transport phenomena. His group primarily employs the tools of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), in particular highly resolved direct numerical simulations, in order to obtain insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the spatio-temporal evolution of a wide variety of geophysical and multiphase flow fields. Occasionally, his group extends their analyses to address issues of linear stability as well. Frequently, they collaborate closely with corresponding experimental investigations. Some current interests focus on gravity and turbidity currents.

Luc Oger

is a member of the Physics Institute of Rennes at the University of Rennes 1 (France). His research concerns mainly Discrete Element Methods models applied to granular flows, aeolian transport and dense granular packings with humidity interactions.

Michael Sørensen

is a faculty member of the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen (Denmark). His general research area is modelling of stochastic dynamical systems. A main interest has for many years been modelling of aeolian sand transport. Another is statistical methods for stochastic differential equations.

Alexandre Valance

is a member of the Physics Institute of Rennes at the University of Rennes 1 (France). His research concerns granular flows, aeolian and fluvial sediment transport and sand dune dynamics.

Nathalie Vriend

is a research fellow in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP) at the University of Cambridge. Her research interests include the connection between granular flows and geophysical applications, including the study of sand dune migration, singing sand dunes, dynamics of snow avalanches and, most recently, granular segregation in an avalanching geometry.