EGU 2014


Letter from organizers:

Dear Colleague,

We write this email to encourage your participation to the session we organize on geophysical flows, sediment transport and associated morphologies. We would like this session to be a place were researchers from both physics and earth sciences discuss issues in theoretical, numerical and experimental problems related to geophyscial flows in a very broad sense (dense granular flows, fluid mechanics, river dynamics, wind blown morphologies etc...). We think you might be interested to join us and are certain you could add a valuable contribution to the debate. We enclose the abstract below plus some informations and deadlines.

We hope to meet you in Vienna for fruitful interactions.

The convenors:

Pascale Aussilous (Groupe Ecoulements de Particles (GEP) IUSTI, Polytech Marseille, France),
Jim McElwaine (Department of Earth Sciences, Durham university, U.K),
François Métivier (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France),
Meredith Reitz (Lamont-Doherty Earh Observatory, USA),
Lydie Staron (Institut Jean le Rond d'Alembert, France)

Link to the session: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/session/15353

The abstract submission deadline is 16 January 2014, 13:00 CET. To submit an abstract please check http://www.egu2014.eu/abstract_management/how_to_submit_an_abstract.html

In case you would like to apply for financial support, please submit an application no later than 29 November 2013. More information on: http://www.egu2014.eu/support_and_distinction.html

Abstract:
Most of the processes that shape the landscapes on which we live result from complex interactions between topography, fluids (water, air, ice) and sediments.Among these interactions erosion and deposition, grain sorting, pattern formation and large scale flows all form fundamental stages in landscape evolution
This session therefore seeks to understand the basic mechanisms and boundary conditions under which sediment and flow movement shape the Earth's surface. We welcome experimental, theoretical and numerical contributions, that address the transport of fluid and sediments over a landscape. This includes, for instance, continuum and granular surface flow mechanics, particle and bedform dynamics, segregation processes or scale integration.